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20130206
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to essentially double fuel economy up to 54.5 miles per gallon. it does it in a way that collaborates with the automakers themselves in a way that will produce the kind of cars that are safe and effective and performed the way americans consume or want to see and will really provide tremendous societal benefits. so what is a win for everyone and that is my basic message. if you look at it on the climate change site, what we're talking about is over the course of 2012 through 2025, vehicles will reduce carbon pollution by 6 billion metric tons. were talking about 12 and arrows of oil saved. these are numbers not to be sneezed at, ladies and gentlemen. these are very large benefits for society. we saw automakers standing up, touting this initiative because they knew they could produce cars are more efficient and consumers who want to purchase. on the consumer side, perhaps consumers here are the biggest winners of all. they're going to get cars that perform the way they want better safe, that is, provide them utility they need, but they're going to save money in their pocketbooks every
bank independence. and not those. second, our concern is that japan is the third largest economy in the world. pursuing what looks like a deliberate policy of driving down the exchange rate that would potentially have destabilizing effects. after all, japan is not a deficit country. it is still like a strong external position. how would you want those two concerns with people outside japan and how they feel about what you are doing? [inaudible conversations] >> thank you, martin. first of all, you might say that it could undermine the central bank. in the case of japan so far. there has not been any undertakings to share the information that was recovered with the central bank. for the first time we came to an agreement of 2% inflation and the central bank declared that through our own efforts to achieve this ability and in the part of government, in order to achieve growth in the fiscal consolidation for both government and the bank of japan, apparently this is past. so that is the purpose of the joint statement. it is not any divergence from the international standard. then bas
to economies of scale. retirement income options would be current and former employees that have little incentive to do so. our defined contribution system is not perfect, but there's other things to make it substantively better. in conclusion we can increase coverage by creating a low-cost mechanism for small employers can benefit from the east of payroll deduction to fund a retirement savings account. we can encourage employers and ways for higher employer contribution rates. third, we can limit plant them for three can encourage the adoption of annuity options. thank you. >> thank you, dr. madrian. ask around the five-minute questions. i want you to know we are looking at the leakage problem and something i've become more aware of and hopefully this committee will be looking at the shortly. let me ask you -- share this retirement plan, a key open issue is that the contribution rate should be. those who have been working on developing this plan have thought about it not for social security between employer to give you contribution was some low threshold employer match and allowing an
? >> guest: what i see is in an economy that isn't growing fast enough to produce many jobs. the unemployment rate was 7.8% in december, and, you know, it had looked like it was moving down and now we see that it pops up. and the reason for that is 157,000 jobs created in an economy with 140 million workers is not a lot. it's not enough to keep up with growth in the labor force, so, you know, this is a fundamental problem in our economy. you might argue the fundamental problem in our economy right now is that we're not growing fast enough to bring the unemployment rate down to levels that most americans would find acceptable. and we can have a loan discussion about -- long discussion about why we're not growing fast enough. you know, you could argue that the economy needs more investment, that the government should be providing more stimulus. you could argue the government is getting in the way. you can also argue that it's a res due of the financial crisis. >> host: the number of employed persons was -- little changed in january. the number of long-term unem employed unchanged to 4.7 million
makes it special is that we have a social market economy and we have focused on environment and climate issues. we will also try to make a good basis of that. and all of the other things that make europe special. what we need to do is to change what we feel is our core values. we need to do this come as, as i have tried to do back home in denmark. we have done three things. first of all, we have kept an extremely tight budget. we have adopted a budget legislation and we can no longer exceed our budget from here on turn year-to-year. all of this means that we have a very low interest rate in denmark, we have become a safe haven. a tight budget is important. the second thing is to be on a reform friendly. we have performed so much the last year that i don't think it has any comparison in our history. we have performed early retirement, and we have now reformed the benefit system. we are trying to reform the education system. we have been on a big frenzy. there then come i feel that this is important. we have tried to bring balance into our budget. at the same time, having a focus on the g
the economy rebounds in the contracts are scheduled to grow at a rate that will not outpace the rest of the economy so that it is an unaffordable system. and the final piece is that we work in partnership to help them be successful in this model because we have the data in this holistic view that they don't necessarily have. many of them, most of them function under this set of incentives that are really now 180 degrees in difference. working together and profit sharing and so forth, we are actually making enormous strides and we have, in massachusetts, we are looking very differently. maggie asked about care that looks like that. you know, care that looks and feels like they care because we are very concerned about avoiding those unnecessary emergency room visits and the things that add enormous expense. i am optimistic that, you know, we can do it in one area of the country. with the same burning platform of affordability that exist everywhere else, that this can happen and medicare can happen either way. >> okay, so we have lots of examples of what works and they are out there. al
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6